Garage Talk, Maryland News — September 13, 2013 at 11:04 am

Scheduling conflicts Ends Grand Prix of Baltimore

Grand Prix of Baltimore will not be held next year due to scheduling conflicts with other large events in Baltimore. “The calendar conspired against us,” JP Grant, the Grand Prix of Baltimore general manager, said during a press conference Friday. For better or for worse, because the event’s official reasoning for ending is “scheduling conflicts” proponents don’t necessarily “lose” and opponents don’t necessarily “win”. We’ll never truly know, one way or the other.

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Here’s a great reader-submitted-letter to the Baltimore Sun:

Detractors of the Baltimore Grand Prix (or most things) typically speak in broad terms using “no one liked” or “everyone was glad to see it go.” These are typically false misnomers which apply only to their disgruntled clique of friends. I have friends who live in the immediate vicinity of the Baltimore Grand Prix who absolutely loved the event, and these are not car people.

Thirty or so years ago, James Rouse’s plan for the Inner Harbor had it’s share of detractors, most of whom wouldn’t dare admit as much today. While the race may never have rivaled Monaco, it was certainly on track to rival its counterpart in Long Beach, Calif. But explaining that to the provincial mind is an exercise in futility as in all likelihood, they’d be content to think the earth is still flat.

By the by, I did, in fact, meet a gentleman from Monaco who was specifically in town for the Baltimore Grand Prix. In marketing speak, that’s some pretty impressive “reach.”

Detractors of the Baltimore Grand Prix (or most things) typically speak in broad terms using “no one liked” or “everyone was glad to see it go.” These are typically false misnomers which apply only to their disgruntled clique of friends. I have friends who live in the immediate vicinity of the Baltimore Grand Prix who absolutely loved the event, and these are not car people.

Thirty or so years ago, James Rouse‘s plan for the Inner Harbor had it’s share of detractors, most of whom wouldn’t dare admit as much today. While the race may never have rivaled Monaco, it was certainly on track to rival its counterpart in Long Beach, Calif. But explaining that to the provincial mind is an exercise in futility as in all likelihood, they’d be content to think the earth is still flat.

By the by, I did, in fact, meet a gentleman from Monaco who was specifically in town for the Baltimore Grand Prix. In marketing speak, that’s some pretty impressive “reach.”

Source: The Baltimore Sun

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